Tag Archives: creationism

Seriously, this is NOT a creation science website.

It is the website of a creationist, but that’s not the same thing. My goal here is not so much to promote creationism as it is to point out that evolutionism should not be part of science, although (unofficially) it is. Don’t be surprised if I get around to pointing out that creation science theories are also outside of the natural realm  of science as well. I will be lampooning (or mildly questioning, depending on the case) evolutionism mostly, mostly because it’s the biggest (in many ways) transgressor of the proper limits of science.

It’s true that I see this as just a first step, the recognition of the difference between the kind of science that can be demonstrated and truly can’t be denied without direct consequences in cases where it is applicable, and the newer sciences that include claims (hypotheses, theories, and sometimes pontification) which can’t be demonstrated to be true and can be denied without any problem — unless it gets you censored, blacklisted, or fired. And believing in creation rather than evolution is just a step toward eventually acknowledging Jesus of Nazareth as Messiah/Christ, God manifest in the flesh, repenting of your sin and receiving eternal salvation by calling on the Lord in faith, being redeemed by His sacrifice and justified by His resurrection.  Continue reading Seriously, this is NOT a creation science website.

I’m not claiming this is my idea…

Sir Francis Bacon and The Foundations of Science (this is a long one)

Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626) was not a scientist or “natural philosopher” as they were known in his time. He worked in the British government. He left office in disgrace, having been convicted of bribery. His writings, however, described the method of studying the workings of nature as natural philosophers had begun to do, putting in print the heart of what was to become known as science. It was an exciting, turbulent time. Even back in the so-called “Dark Ages” a number of technological and social changes had begun. The Renaissance; Reformation; Counter-Reformation; wars of religion and succession (with increasingly advanced and deadly weapons); voyages of exploration (and acquisition) by Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Henry Hudson and others; the printing press; the works of Da Vinci, Galileo, and Kepler — all had begun to transform the world from the way things had been (more or less) for thousands of years into the modern world we’re living in.
Continue reading I’m not claiming this is my idea…